Posts tagged international bankers

Gerald Celente: Banker Suicides the Prequel to Global Collapse

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Gerald Celente: Banker Suicides the Prequel to Global Collapse

 

3-4-2014 6-06-18 AM

 

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Published by NextNewsNetwork

Published on Mar 3, 2014

Gerald Celente: Banker Suicides Prequel to Global Collapse – The onset of the great depression of the 1930′s brought a spike in banker suicides, Will Rogers noted of the time, “When Wall Street took that tail spin, you had to stand in line to get a window to jump out of, and speculators were selling space for bodies in the East River.”

Winston Churchill – the day after Black Friday – observed, “Under my very window a gentleman cast himself down fifteen stories and was dashed to pieces, causing a wild commotion and the arrival of the fire brigade,”

Nearly Eighty-five years later the phenomenon of banker suicides appears to have returned.

The week of January 20th would be the last for Swiss Re AG communications director Tim Dickenson but wouldn’t be the last in a string of deaths and suicides for International bankers.

Just days after Dickenson’s death on January 26, police found former Deutsche Bank executive Bill Broeksmit in his South Kensington London home after he’d hung himself.

The next day on January 27, JP Morgan senior manager Gabriel Magee, jumped 500 feet to his death from JP Morgan’s central London Headquarters he was a 39-year-old

A few days later on January 29, Cheif Economist for Seattle based Russel investments, Mike Dueker, was reported missing by friends, he was found later at the base of a 50 foot embankment. Police called it a suicide.

On February 4th, in a bizarre manner of death, the coroner ruled Suicide for Richard Talley, 57 who founded American Title Services in Centennial, Colorado. He had a total of eight wounds to his body and head – the method of death – a Nail Gun.

Last week on, February 17th, Dennis Li Junjie jumped to his death, shortly after lunch, from a the roof of the Asian headquarters for JP Morgan – he was only 33.

In the last eight months there have been at least 12 reported deaths of bankers perishing under questionable circumstances.

High stress banking careers are being blamed for the recent suicides. However, the answer may not be that simple.

Returning to the program, via Skype from his New York office, to give us insight into these deaths is Gerald Celente publisher of the Trends Journal.

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Iceland Declares Independence from International Banks

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By Bill Wilson

Iceland is free.  And it will remain so, so long as her people wish to remain autonomous of the foreign domination of her would-be masters — in this case, international bankers.

On April 9, the fiercely independent people of island-nation defeated a referendum that would have bailed out the UK and the Netherlands who had covered the deposits of British and Dutch investors who had lost funds in Icesave bank in 2008.

At the time of the bank’s failure, Iceland refused to cover the losses.  But the UK and Netherlands nonetheless have demanded that Iceland repay them for the “loan” as a condition for admission into the European Union.

In response, the Icelandic people have told Europe to go pound sand. The final vote was 103,207 to 69,462, or 58.9 percent to 39.7 percent.   “Taxpayers should not be responsible for paying the debts of a private institution,” said Sigriur Andersen, a spokeswoman for the Advice group that opposed the bailout.

A similar referendum in 2009 on the issue, although with harsher terms, found 93.2 percent of the Icelandic electorate rejecting a proposal to guarantee the deposits of foreign investors who had funds in the Icelandic bank. The referendum was invoked when President Olafur Ragnur Grimmson vetoed legislation the Althingi, Iceland’s parliament, had passed to pay back the British and Dutch.

Under the terms of the agreement, Iceland would have had to pay £2.35 billion to the UK, and €1.32 billion to the Netherlands by 2046 at a 3 percent interest rate.  Its rejection for the second time by Iceland is a testament to its people, who feel they should bear no responsibility for the losses of foreigners endured in the financial crisis.

That opposition to bailouts led to Iceland’s decision to allow the bank to fail in 2008.  Not that the taxpayers there could have afforded to.  As noted by Bloomberg News, at the time the crisis hit in 2008, “the banks had debts equal to 10 times Iceland’s $12 billion GDP.”

“These were private banks and we didn’t pump money into them in order to keep them going; the state did not shoulder the responsibility of the failed private banks,” Iceland President Olafur Grimsson told Bloomberg Television.

The voters’ rejection came despite threats to isolate Iceland from funding in international financial institutions.  Iceland’s national debt has already been downgraded by credit rating agencies, and now those same agencies have promised to do so once again as punishment for defying the will of international bankers.

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