Posts tagged fake

2012 Elections: Schemes to Ensure the Re-Election of Barack Obama

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Source: http://occupycorporatism.com

By
Occupy Corporatism

2012 Elections: Schemes to Ensure the Re-Election of Barack Obama, voter fraud, rigged, election, The US government, under the leadership of the globalist puppet, Barack Obama, knows that the general American public is waking up to the tyranny that is being forced upon them. The divide and conquer ideal purveyed by the mainstream media (MSM) in America may be the second false flag that coerces us into having a “civil war” before the November 2012 elections.

Obama has amassed a “legion of lawyers” to flood the court system with support should problems arise from the voting process. The preparatory process alludes to the fact that they anticipate a problem with the voting.

The electronic voting booths are being pushed in time for the 2012 presidential election season as a way to answer to potential issues brought on my mail-in ballots by overseas Americans and US armed forces service members.

A report by Counting Votes 2012 says that electronically submitted ballots cannot be independently audited and are prone to being hacked. Additionally, electronic voting leaves nothing to recount in a dispute.

Pam Smith of the Verified Voting Foundation explains: “They’re trying to do a calculus and make it easy for the voter, and they may not realize the great risk they’re putting those votes at.”

The Obama campaign, Obama for America, is suing to restrict the right of military service people to be able to vote 3 days early in Ohio as is allowed by law . The Obama administration believes this law is “arbitrary” and has “no discernable rational basis.”

The National Defense Committee stated : “[f]or each of the last three years, the Department of Defense’s Federal Voting Assistance Program has reported to the President and the Congress that the number one reason for military voter disenfranchisement is inadequate time to successfully vote.”

In 2003, Aviel D. Rubin, technical director of the Information Security Institute at Johns Hopkins University, along with a team of researchers showed that electronic voting systems software from Diebold Election Systems had “stunning, stunning flaws.”

These voting booths, equipped with computer-chipped smart cards that could be remotely manipulated quite easily.

In 2010, the District of Columbia set up a fake voting program and encouraged hackers to attempt to corrupt their system. One hacker group was successful in changing the votes, showing that electronic voting systems are easily manipulated.

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The online voting option is still a hopeful option as an alternative for the 20% of the 2.5 military voters that would otherwise send in absentee ballots, according to the Military Voters Protection Project .

The globalization of American voting has begun with the purchase of the process to be overseen by a private corporation controlled by SOE software which operates under the name Clarity Elections.

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Rick Santorum calls President Obama a “nig”

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Rick Santorum calls President Obama a “nig”

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The complete video coverage of Santorum’s speech to a crowd at The Armory in Janesville, Wisconsin can be found following the link below.  His ignorant slip up comes about 34:31 into this disgusting video filled with smooth con job rhetoric.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nzyvo8SKa0M

Rick Santorum catches himself before uttering the second syllable.  Wow, and this is the person many Christian right wing conservatives are supporting because they feel he has such high morals, values and religious beliefs.  Funny how a Freudian slip brings out the real person’s thoughts and attitude. Wake up folks and quit being the sheep listening to the shepherd and start thinking for youselves.  If you feel Santorum is honest, upright and represents anything having to do with freedom you have been truly deceived, either by others or by yourself.  Do your diligent homework or go back to sleep, should you be one of the sheep following the shepherd off a cliff.

Should Using a Fake Name Mean Forfeiture of Fourth Amendment Rights?

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Source: http://www.theblaze.com

If you thought using a fake name to buy your cellphone plan was a good idea — disregarding the likelihood that you were probably planning some sneaky activity — the Department of Justice is saying you may have just waived away your Fourth Amendment rights with that move.

(Photo: US Patent and Trademark Office)

According to the Wall Street Journal, Daniel David Rigmaiden did just that and his phone was tracked without a warrant using a stingray device by the government in order to reveal that he was filing fraudulent tax returns. Use of this device without a warrant was deemed in court as unconstitutional. But now, the Department of Justice is saying that because Rigmaiden used a fake name and address of a deceased person to create this account and purchase equipment, his rights under the Fourth Amendment that would have required a warrant are forfeited.

(Related: Should law enforcement‘s ’stingray’ system track you without a search warrant?)

More specifically, Gizmodo reports, that a search warrant was not obtained to track Rigmaiden’s cellphone location, which led authorities to an apartment — at which point they did receive a warrant to search — where they found his fake ID and a broadband card with the allegedly incriminating evidence.

WSJ reports that in other recent cases warrantless searches have been permitted when the person searched used fraud to obtain the device. Still, there are opponents to this school of thought, holding that people “have a reasonable expectation of privacy”, which would still require a warrant:

“It’s not against the law to use a fake name,” said Adam Candeub, director of the Intellectual Property, Information and Communications Law Program at Michigan State University. The use of a fake ID and signing of a lease might be a different matter, though. “It can be fraudulent if you are entering into a contract under a fake name, but if it is a simple retail transaction the law is not clear,” he said.

WSJ reports Susan Freiwald, professor at the University of San Francisco School of Law, said that using a fake name is not a large enough offense to strip away these rights.

I Like Fake Romney :)

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Bottom line,

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Peter Schiff on Newt Gingrich’s phony conservatism and admiration for FDR

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The Peter Schiff Show
12/14/2011
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Fake terror plots, paid informants: the tactics of FBI ‘entrapment’ questioned

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Source: http://www.guardian.co.uk

Critics say bureau is running a sting operation across America, targeting vulnerable people by luring them into fake terror plots

The FBI has drawn criticism over its apparent use of 'entrapment' tactics. Photograph: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

 

David Williams did not have an easy life. He moved to Newburgh, a gritty, impoverished town on the banks of the Hudson an hour or so north of New York, at just 10 years old. For a young, black American boy with a father in jail, trouble was everywhere.

Williams also made bad choices. He ended up going to jail for dealing drugs. When he came out in 2007 he tried to go straight, but money was tight and his brother, Lord, needed cash for a liver transplant. Life is hard in Newburgh if you are poor, have a drug rap and need cash quickly.

His aunt, Alicia McWilliams, was honest about the tough streets her nephew was dealing with. “Newburgh is a hard place,” she said. So it was perhaps no surprise that in May, 2009, David Williams was arrested again and hit with a 25-year jail sentence. But it was not for drugs offences. Or any other common crime. Instead Williams and three other struggling local men beset by drug, criminal and mental health issues were convicted of an Islamic terrorist plot to blow up Jewish synagogues and shoot down military jets with missiles.

Even more shocking was that the organisation, money, weapons and motivation for this plot did not come from real Islamic terrorists. It came from the FBI, and an informant paid to pose as a terrorist mastermind paying big bucks for help in carrying out an attack. For McWilliams, her own government had actually cajoled and paid her beloved nephew into being a terrorist, created a fake plot and then jailed him for it. “I feel like I am in the Twilight Zone,” she told the Guardian.

Lawyers for the so-called Newburgh Four have now launched an appeal that will be held early next year. Advocates hope the case offers the best chance of exposing the issue of FBI “entrapment” in terror cases. “We have as close to a legal entrapment case as I have ever seen,” said Susanne Brody, who represents another Newburgh defendant, Onta Williams.

Some experts agree. “The target, the motive, the ideology and the plot were all led by the FBI,” said Karen Greenberg, a law professor at Fordham University in New York, who specialises in studying the new FBI tactics.

But the issue is one that stretches far beyond Newburgh. Critics say the FBI is running a sting operation across America, targeting – to a large extent – the Muslim community by luring people into fake terror plots. FBI bureaux send informants to trawl through Muslim communities, hang out in mosques and community centres, and talk of radical Islam in order to identify possible targets sympathetic to such ideals. Or they will respond to the most bizarre of tip-offs, including, in one case, a man who claimed to have seen terror chief Ayman al-Zawahiri living in northern California in the late 1990s.

That tipster was quickly hired as a well-paid informant. If suitable suspects are identified, FBI agents then run a sting, often creating a fake terror plot in which it helps supply weapons and targets. Then, dramatic arrests are made, press conferences held and lengthy convictions secured.

But what is not clear is if many real, actual terrorists are involved.

Fort Dix FiveThe homes of the Fort Dix Five were raided by the FBI. Photograph: Joseph Kaczmarek/APAnother “entrapment” case is on the radar too. The Fort Dix Five – accused of plotting to attack a New Jersey army base – have also appealed against their convictions. That case too involved dubious use of paid informants, an apparent over-reach of evidence and a plot that seemed suggested by the government.

Burim Duka, whose three brothers were jailed for life for their part in the scheme, insists they did not know they were part of a terror plot and were just buying guns for shooting holidays in a deal arranged by a friend. The “friend” was an informant who had persuaded another man of a desire to attack Fort Dix.

Duka is convinced his brothers’ appeal has a good chance. “I am hopeful,” he told the Guardian.

But things may not be that easy. At issue is the word “entrapment”, which has two definitions. There is the common usage, where a citizen might see FBI operations as deliberate traps manipulating unwary people who otherwise were unlikely to become terrorists. Then there is the legal definition of entrapment, where the prosecution merely has to show a subject was predisposed to carry out the actions they later are accused of.

Theoretically, a simple expression, like support for jihad, might suffice, and in post-9/11 America neither judges nor juries tend to be nuanced in terror trials. “Legally, you have to use the word entrapment very carefully. It is a very strict legal term,” said Greenberg.

But in its commonly understood usage, FBI entrapment is a widespread tactic. Within days of the 9/11 terror attacks, FBI director Robert Mueller issued a memo on a new policy of “forward leaning – preventative – prosecutions”.

Central to that is a growing informant network. The FBI is not choosy about the people it uses. Some have criminal records, including attempted murder or drug dealing or fraud. They are often paid six-figure sums, which critics say creates a motivation to entrap targets. Some are motivated by the promise of debts forgiven or immigration violations wiped clean. There has also been a relaxing of rules on what criteria the FBI needs to launch an investigation.

Often they just seem to be “fishing expeditions”. In the Newburgh case, the men involved met FBI informant Shahed Hussain simply because he happened to infiltrate their mosque. In southern California, FBI informant Craig Monteilh trawled mosques posing as a Muslim and tried to act as a magnet for potential radicals.

Monteilh, who bugged scores of people, is a convicted felon with serious drug charges to his name. His operation turned up nothing. But Monteilh’s professed terrorist sympathy so unnerved his Muslim targets that they got a restraining order against him and alerted the FBI, not realising Monteilh was actually working on the bureau’s behalf.

Muslim civil rights groups have warned of a feeling of being hounded and threatened by the FBI, triggering a natural fear of the authorities among people that should be a vital defence against real terror attacks. But FBI tactics could now be putting off many people from reporting tip-offs or suspicious individuals.

“They are making mosques suspicious of anybody. They are putting fear into these communities,” said Greenberg. Civil liberties groups are also concerned, seeing some FBI tactics as using terrorism to justify more power. “We are still seeing an expansion of these tools. It is a terrible prospect,” said Mike German, an expert at the American Civil Liberties Union and a former FBI agent who has worked in counter-terrorism.

German said suspects convicted of plotting terror attacks in some recent FBI cases bore little resemblance to the profile of most terrorist cells. “Most of these suspect terrorists had no access to weapons unless the government provided them. I would say that showed they were not the biggest threat to the US,” German said.

“Most terrorists have links to foreign terrorist groups and have trained in terrorism training camps. Perhaps FBI resources should be spent finding those guys.”

Also, some of the most serious terrorist attacks carried out in the US since 9/11 have revolved around “lone wolf” actions, not the sort of conspiracy plots the FBI have been striving to combat. The 2010 Times Square bomber, Faisal Shahzad, only came to light after his car bomb failed to go off properly. The Fort Hood killer Nidal Malik Hasan, who shot dead 13 people on a Texas army base in 2009, was only discovered after he started firing. Both evaded the radar of an FBI expending resources setting up fictional crimes and then prosecuting those involved.

Yet, as advocates for those caught up in “entrapment” cases discover, there is little public or judicial sympathy for them. Even in cases where judges have admitted FBI tactics have raised serious questions, there has been no hesitation in returning guilty verdicts, handing down lengthy sentences and dismissing appeals.

The Liberty City Seven are a case in point. The 2006 case involved an informant, Elie Assaad, with a dubious past (he was once arrested, but not charged, for beating his pregnant wife). Assaad was let loose with another informant on a group of men in Liberty City, a poor, predominantly black, suburb of Miami. The targets were followers of a cult-like group called The Seas of David, led by former Guardian Angel Narseal Batiste.

The group was, perhaps, not even Muslim, as its religious practices involved Bible study and wearing the Star of David. Yet Assaad posed as an Al-Qaida operative, and got members of the group to swear allegiance. Transcripts of the “oath-taking” ceremony are almost farcical. Batiste repeatedly queries the idea and appears bullied into it. In effect, defence lawyers argued, the men were confused, impoverished members of an obscure cult.

Yet targets the group supposedly entertained attacking included the Sears Tower in Chicago, Hollywood movie studios and the Empire State Building. Even zealous prosecutors, painting a picture of dedicated Islamic terrorists, admitted any potential plots were “aspirational”, given the group had no means to carry them out.

Nonetheless, they were charged with seeking to wage war against America, plotting to destroy buildings and supporting terrorism. Five of them got long jail sentences. Assaad, who was recently arrested in Texas for attempting to run over a policeman, was paid $85,000 for his work.

This year the jailed Liberty City men launched an appeal and last week judgment was handed down. They lost, and officially remain Islamic terrorists hell-bent on destroying America. Not that their supporters see it that way.

“Our country is no safer as a result of the prosecution of these seven impoverished young men from Liberty City,” said Batiste’s lawyer, Ana Jhones.

“This prosecution came at great financial cost to our government, and at a terrible emotional cost to these defendants and their families. It is my sincere belief that our country is less safe as a result of the government’s actions in this case.”

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