Source: http://www.businessinsider.com

Remember when Warren Buffett — a staunch Obama supporter — said that rich people like him would be willing to pay more taxesto help out? If you do, it will probably shock you that his company, Berkshire Hathaway, has back taxes dating back to 2002.

The New York Post explains:

That’s right: As Americans for Limited Government President Bill Wilson notes, the company openly admits that it owes back taxes since as long ago as 2002.

“We anticipate that we will resolve all adjustments proposed by the US Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) for the 2002 through 2004 tax years … within the next 12 months,” the firm’s annual report says.

It also cites outstanding tax issues for 2005 through 2009.

That’s a big revelation. And given the gravity of it, the New York Post lets Buffett have it:

Obvious question: If Buffett really thinks he and his “mega-rich friends” should pay higher taxes, why doesn’t his firm fork over what it already owes under current rates?

Likely answer: He cares more about shilling for President Obama — who’s practically made socking “millionaires and billionaires” his re-election theme song — than about kicking in more himself.

Mogulite piles on:

Ironic, isn’t it? When Warren Buffett penned that op-ed demanding he be taxed more, we assumed that meant he had actually paid his taxes. Not quite the case. Buffett’s famed company, Berkshire Hathaway, owes taxes that are nearly a decade old.

[...] They promise they’ll work it out with the IRS within the next year. Can’t Buffett just take a little out of his piggy bank and pay up? For a man who so actively preaches honesty and integrity, we’re a little baffled as to why Berkshire won’t just fork over what it owes.

Earlier this month, Buffett penned a New York Times op-ed calling for increased taxes on the wealthy and even titled it “Stop codling the super-rich:”

While the poor and middle class fight for us in Afghanistan, and while most Americans struggle to make ends meet, we mega-rich continue to get our extraordinary tax breaks. Some of us are investment managers who earn billions from our daily labors but are allowed to classify our income as “carried interest,” thereby getting a bargain 15 percent tax rate. Others own stock index futures for 10 minutes and have 60 percent of their gain taxed at 15 percent, as if they’d been long-term investors.

And as The Blaze pointed out when that op-ed was published, this has long been a rallying cry for Buffett.

Consider this 2007 interview he gave to Tom Brokaw:

So maybe it’s no wonder that the Post concludes Buffet and others such as Obama are “disingenuous.”

“That’s clear from their individual behavior: Obama, Buffett and Democrats like Bill Clinton keep saying they want to pay more taxes,” the article says. “Fine. They can always write checks.”

This post originally appeared on The Blaze.